Target Browser Coverage

Previously, we discussed the new editor and browser support within WordPress core. Following up on those conversations, we are officially ending support for Internet Explorer versions 8, 9, and 10, starting with WordPress 4.8. Microsoft officially discontinued supporting these browsers in January 2016, and attempting to continue supporting them ourselves has gotten to the point where it’s holding back development.

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Nextgen Bootstrap/Load Feature Project

The bootstrapping process of WordPress Core (affectionately called the “Bootstrap/Load” component around here) is a critical piece of the system, and everything else depends on it being reliable and performant. However, developers and system administrators also need it to be flexible enough to adapt to the requirements of their differing projects or environments.

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Disclosure of Additional Security Fix in WordPress 4.7.2

WordPress 4.7.2 was released last Thursday, January 26th. If you have not already updated, please do so immediately. In addition to the three security vulnerabilities mentioned in the original release post, WordPress 4.7 and 4.7.1 had one additional vulnerability for which disclosure was delayed. There was an Unauthenticated Privilege Escalation Vulnerability in a REST API Endpoint.

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Supporting the Future of wp-cli

wp-cli is a command-line interface that is deployed and relied upon by almost every major user of WordPress out there. As we head into 2017, I wanted to make that its future is certain for everyone who builds on it, and that the major contributors to the project, chiefly Daniel Bachhuber, are able to work on it even more in the coming year.

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Enhanced PDF Support in WordPress 4.7

WordPress 4.7 makes it easier to preview PDFs in the media library by generating image representations of the first page, which are now used throughout the media library and media attachment screens. If a WP_Image_Editor is available that supports PDF, the following sizes are generated: Full size representation, rendered at 128dpi.

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User Admin Languages and Locale Switching in 4.7

In WordPress 4.7 users will be able to select their preferred locale (language) when editing their profile. 🎉🎉 This allows for greater personalization of the WordPress admin and therefore a better user experience. The back end will be displayed in the user’s individual locale while the locale used on the front end equals the one set for the whole site.

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WordPress REST API Success Metrics

This post is part of the conditional merge of the WordPress REST API. Tracking and measuring specific success metrics is a priority for the WordPress REST API Content Endpoints project. The aim is to be able to look back at the implementation of the feature project to see how it went after the fact, and to utilize that information to inform future decision making.

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Customize Changesets (formerly Transactions) Merge Proposal

This is a merge proposal and overview of Customize Changesets (#30937), a project formerly known and proposed as Customizer Transactions back in January 2015. The customizer is WordPress’s framework for doing live previews of any change on your site. One of the biggest problems the customizer faces right now is that changes are ephemeral.

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REST API Merge Proposal, Part 2: Content API

Hi everyone, it’s your friendly REST API team here with our second merge proposal for WordPress core. (WordPress 4.4 included the REST API Infrastructure, if you’d like to check out our previous merge proposal.) Even if you’re familiar with the REST API right now, we’ve made some changes to how the project is organised, so it’s worth reading everything here.

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WordPress REST API update

There’s a renewed push going on right now to try and get what is being termed “content endpoints” into WordPress core with the 4.7 release. In the first core development meeting of the 4.7 cycle, @helen identified a series of tasks that would need to be analyzed and acted upon to be able to make a new proposal for core inclusion, including identifying existing blockers.

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register_meta() Discussion Recap (July 14, 2016)

As announced yesterday, there was a discussion today covering the future of register_meta(), something that has been in progress for WordPress 4.6 in #35658. This is a recap. 🙂 Attendees: @helen, @ocean90, @rachelbaker, @mikeschinkel, @jsternberg, @sc0ttclark, @richardtape, @swissspidy, @joemcgill, @seancjones, @achbed, @jeremyfelt In #35658, register_meta() uses object subtypes when registering meta so that key registration can be considered unique.

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WP_Post_Type in 4.6

WordPress 4.6 will introduce a new WP_Post_Type class. This changes the global $wp_post_types to an array of WP_Post_Type objects. WP_Post_Type provides methods to handle post type supports, rewrite rules, meta boxes, hooks, and taxonomies. These methods are used internally by register_post_type() and unregister_post_type() . Each post type argument is now a property of WP_Post_Type.

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WP REST API: Versions 2.0 Beta 12.1 and 2.0 Beta 13.1

WP REST API Versions 2.0 Beta 12.1 and 2.0 Beta 13.1 are security releases to address a data privacy issue with the Users endpoint. Given certain parameters, private user data such as email addresses may be exposed to unauthenticated users. This release was coordinated by the REST API team and the WordPress core security team.

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Categories and Tags screens changes

In WordPress 4.6 the Categories and Tags screens (and all the custom terms screens that use the same edit-tags.php page) will change in order to make the visual order of the main elements match the tab order. This change is focused on helping people who use the keyboard to navigate the content or use assistive technologies such as screen readers.

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Call for Component Maintainers

WordPress is organized into 60 components. Each component can have more than one maintainer. A maintainer triages new tickets, looks after existing ones, spearheads or mentors tasks, pitches new ideas, curates roadmaps, and provides feedback to other contributors. Pings/Trackbacks, Date/Time, Autosave, Quick/Bulk Edit, Export, Import, Mail, Permalinks, Rewrite Rules, Post Thumbnails, Menus, and Role/Capability are currently without a maintainer.

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