Microsoft’s next surprise is free Office for iPad, iPhone, and Android

Microsoft’s Office suite for iPad, iPhone, and Android is now free. In a surprise move, the software giant is shaking up its mobile Office strategy to keep consumers hooked to Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents. Starting today, you’ll no longer need an Office 365 subscription to edit documents or store them in the cloud.

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FTC sues AT&T over ‘deceptive’ throttling of unlimited data customers

The Federal Trade Commission is suing AT&T because the second-largest US carrier throttles speeds of its unlimited data customers, a policy that the FTC describes as “deceptive” and “unfair.” In a press release, the FTC said AT&T has “misled millions of its smartphone customers” by slowing down their data speeds after they’ve used up a certain amount of data in a single month.

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Apple accidentally reveals iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3

Apple has made an unusual blunder ahead of its Thursday press event; the company has accidentally revealed both of its new iPads: the iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3. An official user guide for iOS 8 (and 8.1) in the iTunes Store has updated its screenshots ahead of schedule; both new iPads are pictured, and the images reveal each will have a Touch ID fingerprint sensor.

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Zero-calorie sweeteners may trigger blood sugar risk by screwing with gut bacteria

When artificial sweeteners are in the news, it’s rarely positive. In the last few years, sweeteners have been linked to everything from Type 2 diabetes to cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and stroke. Still, products like Splenda and Sweet’N Low remain a cornerstone of many a weight-loss strategy, mostly because doctors don’t quite understand how sweeteners contribute to disease.

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Coca-Cola is bringing back the worst 1990s soda because the internet

If you’re old enough to remember the nineties, you might recall SURGE, Coca-Cola’s “fully-loaded citrus soda with carbos.” Internally, it was developed under the moniker “MDK,” or “Mountain Dew Killer.” Externally, it represented everything that was the nineties in the US – JNCOs, Tony Hawk Pro Skater, pogs, and Kenan & Kel are just slivers of nostalgia compared to Surge.

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The iPhone 6 Plus hands-on: yeah, it’s big

I just had the chance to play with the larger 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus, and while it’s nothing surprising after all the leaks, it’s still a fascinating phone. It’s right in the middle of the familiar iPhone experience and the iPad; enough so that it’s hard to see why anyone would want an iPad mini if they have this larger iPhone.

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Say hello to men who hate the NSA but love invading the privacy of women

Over the weekend someone released hundreds of revealing photos of celebrities that appear to have been stolen from private storage. In response to this, a bunch of anonymous guys on the internet copied them and posted them all over the town square, because the internet is written in ink and if you are ever a victim once in your life the internet will remind you of it forever.

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The Trapper Keeper is back, but it carries tablets instead of homework

Ask anyone who progressed through middle and high school during the ’80s and ’90s how they kept heaps of schoolwork organized, and “Trapper Keeper’ is the answer you’ll hear. But Trapper Keepers were about way more than keeping stuff together; the colorful three-ring binders were an essential school supply.

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Ikea built a website inside Instagram

To help push Ikea’s intensely odd PS 2014 collection, the furniture seller’s Russian division hired ad agency Instinct to build a marketing campaign within Instagram. Navigating to the Instagram account ikea_ps_2014 on your smartphone – it won’t format correctly in your browser – will open up a “website” within the app, consisting of 12 images.

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Supreme Court rules software patents that cover ‘abstract ideas’ are invalid

Software patents aren’t dead, but they just took a blow. In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court has ruled that a series of banking patents didn’t cover a concrete software process but an abstract idea, throwing them out and potentially setting a stricter precedent for future patents. Alice Corp.

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The Amazon smartphone is here: meet the Fire Phone

Amazon doesn’t just sell smartphones anymore – it makes one. In news that should surprise exactly no one, Jeff Bezos has officially unveiled Amazon’s first cellphone, the Fire Phone. It’ll be available July 25th, exclusively on AT&T starting $199, with a two-year contract, and it’s perhaps the most futuristic and wide-ranging device Amazon has ever attempted.

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Verizon slams Netflix ‘PR stunt’ that blamed ISPs for bad streaming quality

Verizon has struck back at what it calls a Netflix “PR stunt” that blames its network for poor video quality. In May, Netflix began testing an error message telling users that congestion with their ISP was hurting their service quality. “The Verizon network is crowded right now,” said one message shown during buffering.

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NBC just locked down Olympics coverage for the next 18 years

NBC will be the only place to watch the Olympics for a very, very long time. The network has just locked down exclusive US rights to Olympic Games coverage through 2032. The new deal is extremely broad and covers just about any broadcast scenario you can think of, including free-to-air television, cable/satellite TV, internet, and mobile viewing.

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Security flaw puts all Internet Explorer users at risk, exposes Windows XP

If you’re still using a 12-year-old operating system, a new security flaw discovered in Internet Explorer should cause you quite a bit of consternation. Microsoft published a security advisory today warning its customers that a vulnerability in all versions of Internet Explorer (6 through 11) could let hackers gain full user permissions over your computer, allowing them to install programs, view and delete data, and much more simply by visiting a website.

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The NSA has exploited Heartbleed bug for years, Bloomberg reports

Bloomberg is reporting that the Heartbleed bug, which shocked the web security community this week, has been known and actively exploited by the National Security Agency for at least two years. According to two anonymous sources familiar with the matter, the bug was kept secret in the interest of national security, while the agency used it to obtain passwords and other data.

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