The wall is the least aggressive part of Trump’s executive actions on immigration

On Wednesday, Donald Trump signed a pair of executive orders that constitute the biggest change to federal immigration policy in a single day in recent memory. Trump signed an order that directs the Department of Homeland Security to begin construction on a wall between the US and Mexico – while cracking down on people who cross the border now, many of whom are children and families seeking asylum from Central America.

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Research says there are ways to reduce racial bias. Calling people racist isn’t one of them.

In 2016, researchers stumbled on a radical tactic for reducing another person’s bigotry: a frank, brief conversation. The study, authored by David Broockman at Stanford University and Joshua Kalla at the University of California Berkeley, looked at how simple conversations can help combat anti-transgender attitudes.

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The real Clinton email scandal is that a bullshit story has dominated the campaign

Some time ago, Hillary Clinton and her advisers decided that the best course of action was to apologize for having used a personal email address to conduct government business while serving as secretary of state. Clinton herself was, clearly, not really all that remorseful about this, and it showed in her early efforts to address it.

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Donald Trump’s slander of Captain Humayun Khan’s family is horrifying, even for Trump

The most emotional moment of the Democratic National Convention was the speech by Khizr Khan, the bereaved father of Army Captain Humayun Khan. With his wife Ghazala by his side, Khan recalled his son’s character, his faith, his patriotism – and, ultimately, his courageous death in the service of the country he loved, and the fellow soldiers he was protecting.

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Why you should stop saying “all lives matter,” explained in 9 different ways

It’s a common conversation these days: One person says, “Black lives matter.” Then another responds, “No, all lives matter.” It’s also a complete misunderstanding of what the phrase “black lives matter” means. The person on the receiving end interprets the phrase as “black lives matter more than any other lives.”

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A guy trained a machine to “watch” Blade Runner. Then things got seriously sci-fi.

Last week, Warner Bros. issued a DMCA takedown notice to video streaming website Vimeo. The notice concerned a pretty standard list of illegally uploaded files from media properties Warner owns the copyright to – including episodes of Friends and Pretty Little Liars, as well as two uploads featuring footage from the Ridley Scott movie Blade Runner.

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The best explanation for Hillary Clinton’s bizarre comments about the Reagans and HIV/AIDS

On Friday, Hillary Clinton made a bizarre claim about Ronald and Nancy Reagan during the former first lady’s funeral: that on HIV/AIDS, they “started a national conversation. When before nobody would talk about it, nobody wanted to do anything about it.” This got the history, as we now know it, completely wrong.

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Donald Trump’s Islamophobic rhetoric resonates with many Republicans

Donald Trump’s call to bar Muslims from entering the country is certainly more repugnant in just about every way – constitutionally, morally, and politically – than anything any other Republican presidential candidate has called for since the terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino. But it’s also not a total outlier.

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Angus Deaton’s badly misunderstood paper on whether happiness peaks at $75,000, explained

Angus Deaton is many things: a celebrated Princeton economist, an expert on measuring well-being and poverty, and, as of Monday morning, the 2015 Nobel laureate in economics. Deaton has an unusually high public profile for an economist – to the point that his research was once cited on Orange is the New Black.

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Why police could seize a college student’s life savings without charging him for a crime

Charles Clarke entered the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airportlast Februaryeager to go back to his mother after a months-long visit with relatives. But instead of a quick, easy trip home to Orlando, Clarke lost his life savings – $11,000 in cash – to law enforcement officials who never even proved he committed a crime.

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Australia confiscated 650,000 guns. Murders and suicides plummeted.

The on-camera shooting of two Virginia reporters Wednesday morning seems bound to evoke, like so many shootings before it, some sort of national conversation about gun control. Which means that there will likely be some of debate about whether it would even be possible for the US to limit its millions of privately held guns – by far a higher per capita gun ownership rate than any other country.

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Living in Switzerland ruined me for America and its lousy work culture

I was halfway through a job interview when I realized I was wrinkling my nose. I couldn’t help myself. A full-time freelance position with a long commute, no benefits, and a quarter of my old pay was the best they could do? I couldn’t hide how I felt about that, and the 25-year-old conducting the interview noticed.

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The FCC just approved the strongest net neutrality rules yet

The Federal Communications Commission has approved its strongest network neutrality rules yet. Three Democrats, including chairman Tom Wheeler, voted for the rules. The two Republicans dissented. The new rules reclassify internet access so it will be regulated like a public utility. The rules apply to both home broadband connections and the wireless networks that power smartphones.

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Why Americans still use Fahrenheit long after everyone else switched to Celsius

Virtually every country on earth aside from the United States measures temperature in Celsius. This makes sense; Celsius is a reasonable scale that assigns freezing and boiling points of water with round numbers, zero and 100. In Fahrenheit, those are, incomprehensibly, 32 and 212. This isn’t just an aesthetic issue.

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Serial revisited: Jay’s interview shreds the case against Adnan Syed

We’ve finally heard from Jay Wilds, the key witness in the murder of Hae Min Lee. And while the story he told the Intercept’s Natasha Vargas-Cooper is more believable than the one he told the police or Adnan Syed’s juries, it also makes Jay, as a witness, less credible – and thus it makes the case against Adnan much weaker.

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Iraq or Missouri?: Images of the military-style crackdown in Ferguson

Images of the military-style crackdown in Ferguson Police in Ferguson, Missouri, have used military-grade equipment, including armored trucks, rifles, sound cannons, and tear gas, in its crackdown against protests for Michael Brown. Sometimes the police act in response to reports of thrown objects, Molotov cocktails, looting, and gunshots.

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Poll: White people think the Michael Brown investigation is going fine

A new Pew poll confirms the not-terribly-surprising fact that there is a huge racial gap in the public’s perception of events in Ferguson. This is seen across a variety of questions they asked, but the two most important are these: Most White Americans have confidence in the integrity of the investigation into Michael Brown’s shooting, black Americans do not.

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